Category Archives: death through denial

NDY Submits Comments On Adult Protective Services Guidelines

The Administration for Community Living (part of the Administration on Aging within the U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services) is seeking comments on draft voluntary consensus guidelines for Adult Protective Services.  The original deadline for comments was October 30, but it’s been extended to November 13.  More information and a portal for submitting online comments … Continue reading NDY Submits Comments On Adult Protective Services Guidelines

Not Dead Yet Submits Written Comments to IOM Transforming End-of-Life Care Committee

As folks who read this blog already know, the Institute of Medicine’s Transforming End-of-Life Care Committee sets aside a portion of its meeting agenda to receive public comments.  At the Committee’s second public meeting, held at Stanford on May 29, DREDF’s Marilyn Golden attended to provide public comments. Not Dead Yet previously submitted written input … Continue reading Not Dead Yet Submits Written Comments to IOM Transforming End-of-Life Care Committee

Why I Support the CRPD

This past week, the U.S. Senate voted to proceed with consideration of U.S.ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).  With a two-thirds majority required to move to the next step, the cloture vote was 61 to 36, with 3 not voting. Not Dead Yet has not yet formally … Continue reading Why I Support the CRPD

Philadelphia: Young Girl Being Denied Transplant Because Her “Retardation” Doesn’t Make Her “Worthy”

Recently, Diane Coleman wrote about new proposals to increase the pool of donor organs, and that have particularly disturbing ramifications in terms of the care and treatment of newly disabled individuals.  We already know that organ transplant teams are more than willing to obtain organs from individuals with long-term disabilities, as highlighted by the case … Continue reading Philadelphia: Young Girl Being Denied Transplant Because Her “Retardation” Doesn’t Make Her “Worthy”